Sunday, December 5, 2010

L.A. Media In Love With Charters

These are the people who will be vying to take over my school.  See my comment below.



Gigi,

The charter school PR machine does a tremendous job of painting a pretty picture about purported academic success at its schools. You repeat it verbatim, with not a single critical question asked, or alternate point of view presented.

You do the public a disservice.

Public, please google "Stanford charter school study" and you will quickly find that only 17% of charters outscore public schools. 17%. If you choose to highlight successful charters (to which you must apply, impose a parent participation requirement, and in some cases legally hold back students a grade, none of which public schools are allowed to do) then you present the public with a misleading view that all charter schools are better than all public schools. Attrition at the "best" charters is high. Where do the students who don't want to be flunked a grade go? Right back to public schools who then get negative PR for being "Titanics".

Charter school CEO's sometimes pay themselves outrageous sums of money because they can, unlike public school workers. Most times they oversee far few less students. Google "Geoffrey Canada salary"

With no requirement to give parents a democratic voice in their schools, charters sometimes conduct financial malfeasance (google "Ivy Academia charter) or financial mismanagement (google "ICEF schools insolvent") with little to no transparency.

Sometimes, the schools are so poorly run, they close mid year or at the end of the year (google "green dot animo justice high school) leaving students and parents in the lurch.

There is no magic bullet to improving education. It takes hard work by parents, students, and teachers, and an interest by all members of society who should support success for all students, not just for a lucky few.

Respectfully,

Martha Infante

3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  2. I like your blog, as we share similar concerns over the state of education in the U.S.
    You might be interested in mine. I talk about the decline we are seeing in schools in relationship to the 1970s.

    www.politicsdecline.wordpress.com

    Good luck going forward.

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  3. I (Heart) Public Education Blog Campaign: Valentine’s Day, 2011

    Everyone who cares about young people cares about our
schools. Our best schools nurture our children, make them feel safe, and able
to take the risks they need to in order to learn. But our schools are in danger
of becoming even more narrowly focused on test preparation, while class sizes
rise, and teachers are blamed for the ravages poverty inflicts on their
students. 
 
We are responding. We love our schools. We declare
Valentine’s Day, 2011, to be I Love Public Education Blog Day. On this day we
will write our hearts out, about why it is that public education is so
important to us, our children, and our democratic society. If you or your readers will join us and tell why you love public education too, send your comments and posts to saveourschoolsmarch@gmail.com.

    Writing will be displayed at the www.SaveOurSchoolsmarch.org website, and will be tweeted with the hashtag #LovePublicEd. We offer the march and events of July 28 to 31st
in Washington, DC, as a focal point for this movement, and we ask participants
to link to this event, so we can build momentum for our efforts. If your readers wish to repeat this post on their own blog, we would love it.

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